The Blood of Wolves (2018) - News Poster

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Takashi Miike to head international competition jury at Japan’s Skip City

Naoko Ogigami has been appointed head of Skip City’s Japanese Film Competition juries.

Japanese filmmaker Takashi Miike will head the jury for the International Competition at this year’s Skip City International D-Cinema Festival (July 13-21).

Naoko Ogigami has been appointed head of Skip City’s Japanese Film Competition juries, which includes sections for features and short films.

Miike’s latest film, First Love, co-produced by Toei and the UK’s Recorded Picture Company, premiered at Cannes last week in the Directors Fortnight section. Ogigami has credits including Close-Knit (2017), which won a Teddy Award and Panorama Audience Award at the Berlin film festival.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

North America’s Largest Showcase Of Japanese Cinema June 6 – June 27, 2019 At The Japanese Canadian Cultural Centre

Centrepiece Highlight

World Premiere of “Dance With Me”

Director Shinobu Yaguchi, Lead Actress Ayaka Miyoshi in attendance

Opening Night

North American Premiere of Masayuki Suzuki’s mystery thriller, “Masquerade Hotel

Special Guests:

Star of “Love’s Twisting Path” – Mikako Tabe

Director of award-winning “Born Bone Born” – Comedian Toshiyuki Teruya “Gori”

Director Tatsushi Omori – “When My Mom Died, I Wanted to Eat Her Ashes” and “Every Day a Good Day

Star of “The Gambler’s Odyssey 2020” – Takumi Saitoh

The samurai, of the cinematic variety, are set to descend on Toronto this summer. They are joined by reluctant sake brewers, yakuza assassins, tea ceremony sages, deadly mahjong-playing robots, dashing hotel detectives, and calculating masters of “corporate kabuki”.

Now in its eighth year, the 2019 Toronto Japanese Film Festival brings Toronto audiences 28 of the finest contemporary Japanese films recognized for excellence by Japanese audiences and critics, international film festival audiences and the Japanese Film Academy.
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Film Review: Dare to Stop Us (2018) by Kazuya Shiraishi

During the latest years, Kazuya Shiraishi has emerged as one of the prominent names of the “entertaining” Japanese film, with works like “The Blood of Wolves” and “Birds Without Names” among others. This tendency of his continues in “Dare to Stop Us”, a rather appealing look at the work of Koji Wakamatsu (Shiraishi actually worked for his production company), through the eyes of an almost completely unknown assistant, Megumi Yoshizumi.

“Dare to Stop Us” is screening atUdine Far East Film Festival

The story begins in 1969, when Megumi, 21-year old at the time, manages to get to Wakamatsu’s “family” as assistant director, through a common acquaintance known as the Spook. While there (with there meaning an office where everyone gatheres to organize their movies), she meets a number of “figures” except the eccentric Wakamatsu, including Masao Adachi, Haruhiko Arai and Kenji Takama, who eventually becomes a love interest. At the beginning,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Film Review: Dare to Stop Us (2018) by Kazuya Shiraishi

During the latest years, Kazuya Shiraishi has emerged as one of the prominent names of the “entertaining” Japanese film, with works like “The Blood of Wolves” and “Birds Without Names” among others. This tendency of his continues in “Dare to Stop Us”, a rather appealing look to the work of Koji Wakamatsu (Shiraishi actually worked for his production company), through the eyes of an almost completely unknown assistant, Megumi Yoshizumi.

“Dare to Stop Us” screened at Helsinki Cine Aasia 2019

The story begins in 1969, when Megumi, 21-year old at the time, manages to get to Wakamatsu’s family as assistant director, through a common acquaintance known as the Spook. While there (with there meaning an office where everyone gathered to organize their movies), she meets a number of “figures” except the eccentric Wakamatsu, including Masao Adachi, Haruhiko Arai and Kenji Takama who eventually becomes a love interest. At the beginning, Wakamatsu ignores her,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

“Shoplifters” is the Best Picture at the 13th Asian Film Awards

It was another successful night for Hirokazu Koreeda’s “Shoplifters“, which won Best Picture at the 13th Asian Film Awards, beating the likes of Lee Chang-dong’s critically acclaimed “Burning” and the hugely successful Chinese film “Dying to Survive” to the prize. The film also won Best Original Music for Haroumi Hosono’s wonderful music.

Director Lee Chang-dong, who returned with “Burning” after an eight years’ absence, was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award. He was also awarded Best Director on the night for “Burning”.

The Best Actor/Actress Awards were evenly shared between productions of different countries, with Koji Yakusho replicating his win at the Japan Academy Awards with a Best Actor win for “The Blood of Wolves“, Zhang Yu winning Best Supporting Actor for the Chinese film “Dying to Survive”, Samal Yeslyamova winning Best Actress for the Russian-German-Polish-Kazakh-Chinese joint production “Ayka” and Kara Hui winning Best Supporting Actress for
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

'Shoplifters' wins best film at Asian Film Awards, Lee Chang-dong wins best director

'Shoplifters' wins best film at Asian Film Awards, Lee Chang-dong wins best director
Hirokazu Kore-eda’s film also took best original music, while Zhang Yimou’s Shadow won four awards in technical categories.

Hirokazu Kore-eda’s Shoplifters won best film at this year’s Asian Film Awards (March 17), although Zhang Yimou’s Shadow took home the biggest haul of prizes with four awards in the technical categories.

Shoplifters was also presented with the award for best original music for its score by Haruomi Hosono.

Korean filmmaker Lee Chang-dong took best director for Burning and was also presented with the lifetime achievement award. Japan’s Koji Yakusho won best actor for The Blood Of Wolves
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'Shoplifters' wins best film at Asian Film Awards

'Shoplifters' wins best film at Asian Film Awards
Hirokazu Kore-eda’s film also took best original music, while Zhang Yimou’s Shadow won four awards in technical categories.

Hirokazu Kore-eda’s Shoplifters won best film at this year’s Asian Film Awards (March 17), although Zhang Yimou’s Shadow took home the biggest haul of prizes with four awards in the technical categories.

Shoplifters was also presented with the award for best original music for its score by Haruomi Hosono.

Korean filmmaker Lee Chang-dong took best director for Burning and was also presented with the lifetime achievement award. Japan’s Koji Yakusho won best actor for The Blood Of Wolves
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Asian Film Awards: ‘Shoplifters’ Named Best Film, Lee Chang-dong Wins Best Director

Asian Film Awards: ‘Shoplifters’ Named Best Film, Lee Chang-dong Wins Best Director
Shadow, by China’s fifth generation heavyweight Zhang Yimou, topped the list of victors at the 13th Asian Film Awards (Afa) with four wins, all in the technical categories.

The awards were otherwise rather evenly distributed with no clean sweep.

The visually stunning martial arts epic Shadow won best cinematography, costume design, production design and sound.

Japanese master Hirokazu Kore-eda’s Cannes winner Shoplifters took home the best film award. South Korean auteur Lee Chang-dong, who received the Lifetime Achievement Award this year, was named best director with Burning.

The best actor award went to Japanese thespian Koji Yakusho for The Blood of Wolves; he ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Asian Film Awards: ‘Shoplifters’ and ‘Burning’ Triumph in Hong Kong

Asian Film Awards: ‘Shoplifters’ and ‘Burning’ Triumph in Hong Kong
“Shoplifters” and “Burning” were the big winners at the 13th Asian Film Awards, with Hirokazu Kore-eda’s family drama winning Best Picture and Lee Chang-dong being named Best Director for his cerebral thriller. “Shadow” led all films by taking home four prizes, with Zhang Yimou’s epic period piece winning four technical awards: Best Production Design, Best Costume Design, Best Cinematography, and Best Editing.

Samal Yeslyamova received Best Actress laurels for her performance in “Ayka,” just as she did at Cannes last year, with “The Blood of Wolves” star Yakusho Kōji joining her as Best Actor. “Burning” only left the ceremony with one of the eight prizes for which it was nominated, but Lee received a Lifetime Achievement award as well. Full list of winners:

Best Picture

“Shoplifters”

Best Director

Lee Chang-dong, “Burning”

Best Actor

Yakusho Kōji, “The Blood of Wolves

Best Actress

Samal Yeslyamova, “Ayka

Best Supporting Actor

Zhang Yu,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Shoplifters’ Wins Best Picture at Asian Film Awards

  • Variety
‘Shoplifters’ Wins Best Picture at Asian Film Awards
Zhang Yimou’s highly stylized period epic “Shadow” was the numerical winner at Sunday’s Asian Film Awards in Hong Kong. It bagged four technical awards. But the major prizes went to Japanese and Korean filmmakers.

Kore-eda Hirokazu’s “Shoplifters,” a Japanese drama about a family surviving on shoplifting, was named best picture. The film had been the surprise Palme d’Or winner at the Cannes festival last year, but has since won wide acclaim and achieved record scores at the Japanese and Chinese box office.“Shoplifters” also won best original music with Japanese music pioneer Hosono Haruomi’s score.

South Korean director Lee Chang-dong won the best director prize for the psychological drama “Burning”, which Lee also co-wrote as an adaptation of a Murakami Haruki short story. Going into the ceremony, “Burning” was the favorite, having been nominated in eight categories. Lee was also presented with a lifetime achievement award,
See full article at Variety »

“Shoplifters” and “The Blood of Wolves” clean up at the 42nd Japan Academy Awards

It was a good day for both Hirokazu Koreeda’s Palme d’Or winner “Shoplifters” as well as Kazuya Shiraishi’s crime thriller “The Blood of Wolves” who both managed to clean up at the 42nd Japan Academy Awards.

For a second year running, a Koreeda film managed to win most awards on the night, with “Shoplifters” picking up a total of eight awards.

The other big winner of the night was “The Blood of Wolves”, which, despite fierce competition in most of the categories in won in from Shoplifters” and others, managed to pick up an impressive four awards, including two for its male leading duo. The other two films to get a look-in were Mamoru Hosoda’s “Mirai” and Shinichiru Ueda’s “One Cut of the Dead“.

Check out all the winners below:s

Best Film: Shoplifters (Hirokazu Koreeda)

Best Animated Film: Mirai (Mamoru Hosoda)

Best Director: Hirokazu Koreeda
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

Asian Film Awards 2019: Lee Chang-dong’s Korean Drama ‘Burning’ Leads Nominations

  • Deadline
Asian Film Awards 2019: Lee Chang-dong’s Korean Drama ‘Burning’ Leads Nominations
Lee Chang-dong’s Cannes hit Burning scored the most nominations for the 2019 Asian Film Awards. The Korean mystery-drama was nominated for eight awards, including best film. Scroll down for nominations in major categories.

Other best film nominees were Hirokazu Kore-eda’s Shoplifters, Pema Tseden’s Jinpa, Wen Muye’s Dying To Survive, and Rajkumar Hirani’s Sanju. The nominations were announced in Hong Kong on Friday afternoon. The winners will be revealed at a ceremony in the same city on Sunday, March 17.

Cannes Palme d’Or winner Shoplifters, Sanju, and Zhang Yimou’s Shadow each garnered six nominations. Kore-eda’s acclaimed drama also won the top film prize at the Asia Pacific Screen Awards in November.

In Burning, Jong-su bumps into a girl who used to live in the same neighborhood as him, who asks him to look after her cat while on a trip to Africa. When back, she introduces Ben,
See full article at Deadline »

Film Review: The Blood of Wolves (2018) by Kazuya Shiraishi

After dealing with the Roman Porno Reboot, doing the same with the Yakuza film was the reasonable path for Kazuya Shiraishi, whose career seems to be picking up during the last few years, with productions like “Twisted Justice”, “The Devil’s Path”, and “Birds Without Names”. Furthermore, his approach toward the Yakuza film, with a combination of Kinji Fukasaku’s aesthetics as dictated in the “Yakuza Papers” and the style of “Training Day”, seems to be the way for the genre to go from now on. Let us take things from the beginning though.

The Blood of Wolves” is screening at Five Flavours Festival

The script is based on the novel “Korou no Chi” by Yuko Yuzuki and is set in 1988 in Hiroshima, prior to the enactment of the anti-organized crime law. Shuichi Hioka is the new guy in the East Kurehara precinct and is partnered up with Detective Shogo Ogami,
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

'The Blood of Wolves' ('Koro no chi'): Film Review | Tokyo 2018

'The Blood of Wolves' ('Koro no chi'): Film Review | Tokyo 2018
“Once more, with feeling,” hollers a sadist mobster in the opening scene of The Blood of Wolves as he readies to saw off yet another finger from his victim. But the words might serve as a concise description of Kazuya Shiraishi’s gangster movie. The Blood of Wolves takes its cues from a staple in Japanese cinema – the yakuza flick as embodied by the legendary Battles Without Honor and Humanity series (1973-76), with which the film shares the same geographical setting of Hiroshima – but then runs with it by dialing up the melodrama and visceral gore, while offering ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Full Program of the 12th Five Flavours Asian Film Festival (November 14-21)

Five Flavours Asian Film Festival is a yearly review of the cinema of East, Southeast, and South Asia. For the 12th time, the Festival presents a meticulous selection of films from the region – auteur projects, avant-garde animations, classics from the film archives, local blockbusters, and Asian Film Awards-winning genre cinema.

The majority of the films will be screened in Poland for the first time. For five of them, the festival screening will be their European premiere. Asian filmmakers will visit the festival and join us for Q&A sessions, providing the titles presented with additional context.

In Asian cinemas, the year 2018 is marked by a variety of auteur projects by renown directors, classic genre cinema, and blockbusters gaining momentum in world-wide box offices. At the same time, a new generation of filmmakers is on the rise – their films already gain visibility and receive awards at international festivals.

The program of
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

The 38th Hawaii International Film Festival (Hiff 2018) has Loads of Asian Titles

Oahunov Nov 8-18, 2018

Kauainov Nov 15-18, 2018

Big Island & Maui Nov 29 -Dec 2, 2018

The 38th Hawaii International Film Festival is about to start and to continue the festival’s proud tradition of showcasing content and creatives from the Pacific, Asia and North America.

The festival this year features over 180 films, talks and events from 37 countries, with 47 Us, International and World Premieres across 32 sections. 2018 continues the tradition of programming a selection of critically-acclaimed and highly-anticipated films from Asia and around the world, while also giving a platform from emerging creative talents from across the Hawaii-Pacific region.

Outstanding films are accompanied by stars and filmmakers from around the world, connecting East and West through a dedication to discussion, diversity and creativity.

We have picked the Asian titles in the Programme and they are a lot!

Let’s have a look:

Shadow – Opening Night Film

China 2018 – Director: Zhang Yimou

50 First Kisses

Spotlight On Japan – Japan
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

HBO releases trailer for first original Japanese series Miss Sherlock

HBO has released a trailer for their first Japanese original production, Miss Sherlock. A co-production between HBO Asia and Hulu Japan, the series is a homage to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s famous Sherlock Holmes series of mystery novels that takes place in the present day and switches the genders of the two main characters. The series stars Yûko Takeuchi (Flashforward) as Sherlock, Shihori Kanjiya (Repeat) as Wato and Ken’ichi Takitô (The Blood of Wolves) as Inspector Reimon.

Miss Sherlock is set in modern-day Tokyo and both lead characters are Japanese women – Dr. Wato Tachibana, a surgeon recently returned from a volunteer doctors’ mission in Syria and Sara Shelly Futaba, an investigation consultant to the police department who solves bizarre and difficult cases. Throughout the series, the pair solves mystery after mystery with Miss Sherlock’s extraordinary observation and reasoning skills.

Miss Sherlock spans 8 episodes and will be available
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

'Revenge' takes Bifan's Best of Bucheon Award

'Revenge' takes Bifan's Best of Bucheon Award
Japanese director Naruse Kiyoto pokes hole in screen with prop sword while re-enacting scene from Night Of The Dead Geisha.

This year’s Bucheon International Film Festival (Bifan) presented its top prize, the Best of Bucheon Award, to Coralie Fargeat’s France-uk co-production Revenge. The award comes with a cash prize of $17,620 (KW20m).

Bifan (July 12-22) held its awards and closing ceremony on Friday night (July 20) followed by two more days of encore screenings.

“The Bucheon Choice: Features international jury comprised actress Barbara Crampton, director Byun Young-joo, scriptwriter Takahashi Hiroshi, Edinburgh film festival artistic director Mark Adams, and actor Kim Kang-woo.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

New York Asian 2018 Dispatch - Japanese Films: Smut Peddlers, Angsty High Schoolers, Enigmatic Murderers and Edo Sisterhood

The Japanese films in this year’s edition of the New York Asian Film Festival are typically eclectic and mostly accomplished, ranging from fresh takes on period films, dark and often disturbing depictions of high school life, to bold takes on genre films. In this fest dispatch, I consider a few notable selections. ----- "Art is an explosion." This is the faux-profound and mockingly pretentious mantra repeated in voiceover by Akira Suei (Tasuku Emoto), the subject of Nyaff opener Dynamite Graffiti,(top), Masanori Tominaga's lengthy biopic of Suei, the notorious porn-mag publisher whose publications - with such innocuous titles as Weekend Super, New Self, and Photo Age - were ubiquitous...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

18th Nippon Connection Film Festival The Program is complete!

The program of the 18th Japanese Film Festival Nippon Connection in Frankfurt am Main is complete! From May 29 to June 3, 2018 the audience can discover more than 100 new short and feature films at the biggest festival for Japanese film worldwide – from blockbusters and anime to independent and documentary films. Almost all of the films will be presented as German, European- international, or world premieres. A diverse supporting program provides about 50 exciting cultural activities apart from the cinema. Numerous Japanese filmmakers, musicians, and artists will be our guests at the festival. As the guest of honor, renowned actress Shinobu Terajima will receive the Nippon Honor Award 2018. The events will take place at the festival centers at Künstlerhaus Mousonturm and Theater Willy Praml in der Naxoshalle as well as four additional locations in Frankfurt am Main.

Nippon Cinema

Once more, many stars of the Japanese film scene will be expected to present
See full article at AsianMoviePulse »

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