On My Skin: The Last Seven Days of Stefano Cucchi (2018) - News Poster

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Netflix, Cannes Film Festival Still at Odds Over Theatrical Release Rules

  • Variety
Netflix’s plan to release “Roma” and two other films theatrically in North America and Europe was hailed in the U.S. as a major shift in strategy for the streaming giant. But the initiative was met with a scornful shrug in France, where exhibitors say it’s unlikely by itself to produce a reconciliation between Netflix and the Cannes Film Festival. Film bodies in Italy and Germany, home to the Venice and Berlin fests, remain skeptical as well.

With six months to go before Cannes’ next edition, artistic director Thierry Frémaux says he believes a compromise can be found to welcome Netflix back on the Croisette. Last month, he and Cannes president Pierre Lescure met with Netflix content boss Ted Sarandos and film chief Scott Stuber at Frémaux’s Lumière Festival in Lyon, which screened “Roma” as part of a tribute to director Alfonso Cuarón. Netflix says talks are
See full article at Variety »

‘Roma’ to Get Limited Theatrical Release in Italy

  • Variety
‘Roma’ to Get Limited Theatrical Release in Italy
Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” will go out theatrically in Italy on about 50 screens as a three-day event release early next month before the film becomes available globally on Netflix.

Italy’s Cineteca di Bologna, known internationally mostly as a film archive and preservation body, has announced that its boutique distribution arm will handle the release of “Roma.” The move comes despite a call by several Italian art-house cinema organizations for exhibitors not to screen “Roma,” which launched in September at the Venice Film Festival and won the Golden Lion.

Though small, the “Roma” event release in Italy will cover all major cities, a representative for Cineteca di Bologna distribution said. It will screen on Dec. 3, 4 and 5, before its appearance on Netflix on Dec. 14.

The Italian “Roma” release is part of Netflix’s push for its biggest theatrical outing to date. The U.S. rollout started in New York and Los Angeles on Nov.
See full article at Variety »

Italy’s Distribution Chief: New Windowing Law Is ‘Not Against’ Netflix (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Netflix has become a big disruptor in Italy since launching half a dozen movies at the Venice Film Festival in September. Among the Netflix six were awards hopeful “Roma,” which won the Golden Lion, and local police-brutality drama “On My Skin,” which after the fest was released simultaneously online by Netflix and in 80 Italian theaters via distributor Lucky Red.

That day-and-date release outraged other Italian distributors, causing Lucky Red boss Andrea Occhipinti to resign as head of the national distributors’ association in September. His successor, Luigi Lonigro, chief of Rai Cinema’s 01 Distribution unit, worked with other industry representatives to draft new rules on release windows, which were unveiled this week. Italy will now enshrine into law the informal 105-day window between a film’s first theatrical screening and its availability on other platforms. Limited-release and under-performing titles can have even shorter lag periods – as little as 10 days. The law
See full article at Variety »

Italy Set to Regulate Theatrical Windows Following Netflix Controversy

  • Variety
Italy is set to regulate its theatrical windows by law, following an uproar over the simultaneous release on Netflix and in theaters of local police-brutality drama “On My Skin.”

New rules announced by Italian Culture Minister Alberto Bonisoli will enshrine in law, for Italian movies, the current gentleman’s agreement among distributors to wait 105 days after a film’s first theatrical screening before it can be released on other platforms, including TV and streaming.

But exceptions can be made for limited-release or under-performing Italian movies. The window will be reduced to 60 days for local films shown on fewer than 80 screens or for those that generate fewer than 50,000 admissions after 21 days in cinemas. The window is even shorter – 10 days – for Italian films screened only for three days.

The head of Italian motion picture association Anica called the country’s upcoming new regulations “a good agreement between all sectors within the Italian cinema industry,
See full article at Variety »

Lucky Red chief steps down from Italian distributors group after 'On My Skin' controversy

Lucky Red chief steps down from Italian distributors group after 'On My Skin' controversy
Andrea Occhipinti says distribution strategy of Venice title has created tension between me and the exhibitors.

Lucky Red president Andrea Occhipinti has stepped down as head of the national association of distributors (Anica) after the controversial day-and-date release of Venice title On My Skin in both theatres and Netflix.

The film, produced by Lucky Red, was distributed in Italian selected theatres on the same day of its Netflix premiere, September 12. The decision caused an uproar from the national associations of exhibitors who refused to screen it.

Occhipinti said in a statement: “I decided to step down because our choice to
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Italian Distributors’ Association Chief Andrea Occhipinti Resigns Following Venice-Netflix Industry “Tension”

  • Deadline
Italian Distributors’ Association Chief Andrea Occhipinti Resigns Following Venice-Netflix Industry “Tension”
Andrea Occhipinti, President of Italy’s film distribution association Anica, has resigned following the drama surrounding the recent day-and-date release of police brutality pic On My Skin.

Occhipinti’s distribution and production outfit Lucky Red sold the film to Netflix before it was set for a contentious Venice Film Festival debut. The well-respected industry vet explained his Anica exit in a statement [translated from Italian], “I decided to resign because our choice of distributing On My Skin by Alessio Cremonini simultaneously in theaters and on Netflix has created many tensions between the theaters who have screened it (few) and those who have chosen not to (many). The success of the film has increased these tensions.

“Although there were precedents in Italy and there is a wider heated debate at an international level, I do not want a purely corporate choice to be considered as the position of Anica distributors, given my role. In
See full article at Deadline »

Head of Italian Distributors’ Group Resigns Over Venice-Netflix Release Spat

  • Variety
Head of Italian Distributors’ Group Resigns Over Venice-Netflix Release Spat
Andrea Occhipinti, the head of Italy’s national distributors’ association, has resigned in the wake of a controversy prompted by the simultaneous theatrical and Netflix release last week of police-brutality drama “On My Skin,” following its Venice Film Festival premiere.

Occhipinti, chief of Rome-based production-distribution company Lucky Red, decided to step down as president of the distributors’ unit within Italy’s motion picture organization, Anica, because “On My Skin’s” release had “created plenty of tensions among exhibitors who programmed the movie (few) and those who chose not to (many),” he said in a statement.

“The film’s success [in movie theaters] increased these tensions,” added Occhipinti, who was one of the film’s producers.

Occhipinti had come under criticism from local exhibitors for participating in the simultaneous release of “On My Skin” in a handful of Italian theaters and on Netflix. Occhipinti called the strategy “a big opportunity,” but many distributors and
See full article at Variety »

Italian Distributors' Network Head Resigns Over Netflix-Venice Feud

Italian Distributors' Network Head Resigns Over Netflix-Venice Feud
Andrea Occhipinti has resigned from his post as president of film distributors at Anica, Italy's leading film organization that represents Italy's producers, distributors and technical industries, following the very public feud between Venice and Italy's film exhibitors who were upset that the festival gave so much of its platform to Netflix.

Occhipinti also served as producer of Alessio Cremonini's On My Skin at his Lucky Red company.

"I decided to resign because our choice of distributing On My Skin by Alessio Cremonini simultaneously in theaters and on Netflix has created many tensions between the operators who have ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Germany’s Largest Cinema Org Issues Netflix Warning As Streamer Encounters Growing Euro Heat

  • Deadline
Exclusive: Netflix remains the industry’s favorite talking point. But as the online giant continues to soar, Europe is starting to push back against its largely unchecked growth.

Hdf Kino, Germany’s largest cinema association, says it agrees with Italian cinema bodies which roundly criticized Netflix’s presence at the Venice Film Festival. The advocacy organization, which has 620 members who account for more than 3,200 cinema screens across Germany, said it would not welcome Netflix films at the Berlin Film Festival which takes place early next year.

“It should be clear that we wouldn’t be pleased if Berlin were to be misused through day and date cinema,” the organization’s CEO Thomas Negele told Deadline. “We represent the same position as the Italian associations.”

Italian trade orgs such as Anec and Anem, as well as European cinema groups Cicae and Unic, condemned Netflix’s presence at Venice and called on
See full article at Deadline »

Italian exhibitors criticise Netflix, Venice Film Festival after Golden Lion win for 'Roma'

Statement describes Venice as a “marketing tool” for Netflix.

Italian exhibitor organisations have criticised Netflix and the Venice Film Festival following awards success for two of the streaming giant’s titles this year.

Netflix won its first Golden Lion for Alfonso Cuaròn’s Roma on Saturday, with the Coen Brothers’ The Ballad Of Buster Scruggs also picking up best screenplay. A small Italian theatrical run is planned for Roma in December.

Several Italian exhibitor organisations have released statements of protest. The first came from minor exhibitors’ associations (those representing Catholic-owned theatres and essai ones) and the National Association of Authors,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

European Arthouse Entity Blasts Venice Chief Alberto Barbera For Pro-Netflix Stance

  • Variety
In the latest salvo against Netflix from the European arthouse community the International Confederation of Art Cinemas (Cicae) has lashed out against Venice Film Festival Artistic Director Alberto Barbera for having Netflix titles screening in competition.

Cicae in a statement issued on Monday blasted Barbera for taking a different attitude than Cannes which earlier this year banned Netflix movies from competition since the streaming giant could not guarantee that they would be shown in French cinemas.

The three Netflix movies competing in Venice that Cicae is up in arms about are Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma,” “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” by the Coen brothers, and Italian director Alessio Cremonini’s police brutality drama “On My Skin.”

Cicae claimed their presence in the Venice competition “encourages practices that endanger an important sector of the film industry,” the statement said, adding that “cinema and television are different mediums” and also that “cinematic
See full article at Variety »

Venice: Art House Cinemas Call for Netflix Ban

The International Confederation of Art Cinemas, Cicae, has spoken out against the Venice Film Festival's decision to screen films backed by Netflix in its official competition.

Alfonso Cuaron's Roma, the Coen brothers' The Ballad of Buster Scruggs and Alessio Cremonini's Italian crime drama On My Skin have all premiered in competition at this year's festival and will all be released worldwide on the streaming service. A fourth Netflix film, Paul Greengrass' terror drama 22 July, will debut in competition in Venice on Wednesday.

In a statement Monday, Cicae called on Venice Film Festival director Alberto Barbera to reserve ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Venice Day Four Mood: Festival & Netflix Riding High

  • Deadline
Venice Day Four Mood: Festival & Netflix Riding High
Venice is killing it.

It’s rare to have such positive critical consensus about so many big movies in the first few days of a festival.

First Man, Roma, The Favourite and A Star Is Born have all gone gangbusters while the Coen’s Buster Scruggs has been widely praised. The festival is pretty much five from five on its biggest movies so far and the buzz has been palpable with so many stars in attendance. Spirits haven’t been dampened by a tremendous downpour last night and the resulting tech hitch at the Star Is Born premiere.

Even the Orson Welles movie The Other Side Of The Wind, which could easily have bombed, has intrigued most. Many have issues with the film but almost all say it still captivates in its way.

I sat down with one of Italy’s leading producers yesterday afternoon who claimed, “Venice really is number one now.
See full article at Deadline »

'On My Skin' ('Sulla mia pelle'): Film Review | Venice 2018

'On My Skin' ('Sulla mia pelle'): Film Review | Venice 2018
Director Alessio Cremonini painstakingly reconstructs the high-profile true-crime case of 31-year-old Stefano Cucchi, a former heroin addict arrested by the Italian military police for possession of drugs and beaten so sadistically he died in custody a week later, in On My Skin (Sulla mia pelle). As tensely focused as a thriller, the film is gripping from start to finish, which is surprising given the familiarity of the case in Italy. One of its main assets is rising star Alessandro Borghi, who lends searing credibility to the doomed youth with his low-class Roman accent and street wit, and he turns Cucchi’...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

New to Netflix in September: ‘Black Panther,’ ‘A Wrinkle in Time,’ and ‘The Breakfast Club’

Ah, movies. Remember those, Netflix viewers? Because why binge every episode of “Queer Eye” when you could do a “Black Panther,” “Spider-Man 3,” and “The Breakfast Club” triple-header? It would take just as much time and be much more educational.

All three are heading to the streaming giant next month, along with “The Cider House Rules,” “A Wrinkle in Time,” and “Groundhog Day.” Netflix gets into the comedy game with originals, including Sanaa Lathan in “Nappily Ever After” and “Sierra Burgess Is A Loser,” starring Shannon Purser of “Stranger Things” and “Riverdale” fame. Rashida Jones makes her directorial debut next month with “Quincy,” the definitive documentary about her legendary father, Quincy Jones.

Who needs TV?

Peep the full list of movies heading to Netflix in September below.

September 1

10,000 B.C.

Another Cinderella Story

Assassins

August Rush

Bruce Almighty

Delirium

Fair Game

Groundhog Day

King Kong

Martian Child

Nacho Libre

Pearl Harbor
See full article at Indiewire »

Patrick Dempsey & Alessandro Borghi To Lead Financial-World Thriller Series ‘Devils’ For Sky Italia & Lux Vide

  • Deadline
Patrick Dempsey & Alessandro Borghi To Lead Financial-World Thriller Series ‘Devils’ For Sky Italia & Lux Vide
Exclusive: Grey’s Anatomy icon Patrick Dempsey and in-demand Italian actor Alessandro Borghi, star of Netflix’s Suburra, are to lead cast in hot new financial-world thriller series Devils for The Young Pope and Gomorrah backer Sky Italia and Medici: Masters Of Florence producer Lux Vide.

Based on the best-selling novel by Italian trader Guido Maria Brera, the anticipated ten-part English-language series will be set in the London office of a major U.S. bank, where the ruthless Head of Trading, Massimo Ruggero (Borghi) from Italy, has been welcomed and introduced to the world of finance by Dominic Morgan (Dempsey), the bank’s CEO. When Ruggero ends up involved in an intercontinental financial war rocking Europe, he has to choose whether to ally himself with his mentor or fight him. The book was partly inspired by the financial crisis that swept global markets in 2008.

Among the Euro series’ strong supporting
See full article at Deadline »

Marone! Venice’s Warm Embrace Of Netflix Divides Italian Biz: “It’s A Wake-Up Call”

  • Deadline
When Cannes refused to show Netflix movies in Competition earlier this year many rolled their eyes. ‘Only in France’, they said. Not so fast, it turns out.

While Venice’s line-up has got most of us salivating, the festival’s warm embrace of Netflix – the streaming giant has a record six movies on the Lido, including three in Competition – has stirred up unexpected tension in the local biz.

Italy’s two largest exhibition trade bodies, Anec and Anem, were first to sound the alarm, on Tuesday criticizing day-and-date streaming and Venice chief Alberto Barbera for including a movie that will show on Netflix soon after its festival debut. Cinemas unhappy about Netflix? ‘Plus ça change’, many probably thought.

But in a sign that Italian frustration over the issue extends beyond the exhibition sector, on Wednesday the 500-strong National Association Of Italian Filmmakers added their voice of discontent into the mix.
See full article at Deadline »

Lucky Red rejects criticism from exhibitors over Netflix Venice title

On My Skin is set to open on Netflix and in certain theatres.

Italian production and distribution company Lucky Red has rejected criticism from exhibitors regarding the simultaneous distribution of its Venice title Sulla mia pelle (On My Skin) on Netflix and in select theatres.

A few days after Alberto Barbera unveiled the complete programme of the 75th Venice Film Festival, Italian exhibitors issued a press release criticising the practice of simultaneously distributing movies both online and in theatres without having shared the strategy in advance with the theatres associations.

On My Skin is the only film in the festival that qualifies for the controversy,
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Italian Distributor Lucky Red Responds To Exhibitor Anger Over Netflix’s Venice Plan

  • Deadline
Italian distributor Lucky Red has responded to anger from local exhibitors that its Venice-bound film On My Skin (Sulla Mia Pelle) will screen on Netflix soon after its festival debut.

In a statement sent to me today, the distributor has said it is “proud” the drama will be shown in Venice and that the film’s near-day-and-date global release is an “extraordinary event” and a “big opportunity” for audiences.

The Italian-language film about police brutality is due to open Venice’s Horizons strand and get a global release via Netflix soon after on September 12. It is also due to have a theatrical component in Italy.

However, earlier this week, trade bodies repping local cinemas issued a strongly worded statement criticizing day-and-date releasing for its impact on traditional models. The statement also took a pop at Venice chief Alberto Barbera for condoning a shortening of the theatrical window.

“Every exhibitor will
See full article at Deadline »

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