Matthias & Maxime (2019) - News Poster

News

‘Matthias & Maxime’ Trailer: Xavier Dolan Directs & Stars In His New Film About Friendship & Love

Xavier Dolan hasn’t stopped moving since his directorial debut, “I Killed My Mother.” After skipping Cannes, and going Hollywood with his last film, “The Death and Life Of John F. Donovan” starring Natalie Portman, Kit Harington and more (and it still doesn’t have a North American distributor), Dolan has returned to his Montreal roots for “Matthias & Maxime,” which had been welcomed back to the Cannes Film Festival earlier this year.

Continue reading ‘Matthias & Maxime’ Trailer: Xavier Dolan Directs & Stars In His New Film About Friendship & Love at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Xavier Dolan’s Original ‘Death and Life of John F. Donovan’ Cut Was Four Hours Long

Xavier Dolan’s Original ‘Death and Life of John F. Donovan’ Cut Was Four Hours Long
Canadian filmmaker Xavier Dolan’s epic drama “The Death and Life of John F. Donovan” has been sitting on the shelf, at least stateside, since its world premiere at the 2018 Toronto Film Festival. Boasting Dolan’s most ambitious cast to date — including Kit Harrington, Jacob Tremblay, Natalie Portman, Kathy Bates, Thandie Newton, and Susan Sarandon — “Donovan” was met with jeers at the festival, including by IndieWire’s critic Eric Kohn. In a new interview with the Globe and Mail, Dolan now says that the film originally ran a lengthy four hours long. As it stands, the film currently runs a cool two hours.

“I shot the film that I wrote, but the film that I wrote was a 160-page script that made no choices,” Dolan said. “You now want to focus on something [the editing] that I’ve been focusing on for two years and I don’t know how inspired I
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Mektoub, My Love: Intermezzo’ Film Review: Abdellatif Kechiche Trolls Cannes With Nsfw Excess

‘Mektoub, My Love: Intermezzo’ Film Review: Abdellatif Kechiche Trolls Cannes With Nsfw Excess
Just when you think you’ve seen it all before, director Abdellatif Kechiche goes and drops something as toxically indulgent as “Mektoub, My Love: Intermezzo,” a three-and-half-hour-long provocation that will now make the “Blue Is the Warmest Color” director the most talked-about man on the Croisette once again — and not in a good way.

This essentially narrative-free sequel to 2017’s “Mektoub, My Love: Canto Uno” takes the already sporadically clothed cast of that previous film, plops them onto a beach for the initial 30 minutes, moves them to a club for the subsequent three hours, leers at every crevice of their bodies along the way and then calls it a day.

Squint hard enough and you can see what he’s going for. Instead of growing the slight narrative seeds he planted with “Canto Uno,” which followed a tight circle of Franco-Algerian young adults over the course of the summer of
See full article at The Wrap »

Xavier Dolan Says ‘Matthias & Maxime’ Isn’t A “Gay” Film: “We Never Talk About Heterosexual Films”

Judging by the buzz coming out of Cannes, it appears that many people really enjoyed filmmaker Xavier Dolan’s latest film “Matthias & Maxime.” Dolan is a filmmaker that has a lot of success at the French festival, and perhaps his latest competition film will add to his already impressive number of accolades. And while speaking at a Cannes press conference (via Deadline), Dolan discussed his latest film and why he doesn’t necessarily like people calling it a “gay” film.

Continue reading Xavier Dolan Says ‘Matthias & Maxime’ Isn’t A “Gay” Film: “We Never Talk About Heterosexual Films” at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Cannes Report, Day 9: Xavier Dolan Grows Up, Neon Falls for ‘Portrait of a Lady on Fire’

Cannes Report, Day 9: Xavier Dolan Grows Up, Neon Falls for ‘Portrait of a Lady on Fire’
Xavier Dolan is “enfant terrible” no more. The director has now turned 30, and he got emotional and teary-eyed while introducing his latest film, “Matthias and Maxime,” on Wednesday at Cannes.

And critics could sense that his latest film suggests the director is slowing down and looking back on his youth with more sensitivity and even maturity.

“‘Matthias & Maxime’ deals with friendship and self discovery in a way that will be familiar to fans of Dolan’s previous work, but it is a, dare we say, more mature work,” TheWrap’s Steve Pond wrote in his review, calling the film a return to form despite the young director’s blistering pace and constant presence at Cannes. “There’s a reflection to go with the gleeful, transgressive energy, a sense of looking back fondly at the jarring but seminal moments that form identity.”

Also Read: 'Matthias & Maxime' Film
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Oh Mercy’ Film Review: Is This Cop Drama a Pilot In Disguise?

‘Oh Mercy’ Film Review: Is This Cop Drama a Pilot In Disguise?
As one of the Cannes Film Festival’s favorite sons, Arnaud Desplechin has been a fixture on the Croisette for more than 20 years.

The director has had six films play in competition, and several others in sidebars. He served on the jury in 2016 and opened the festival with 2017’s “Ismael’s Ghosts.”

For longtime festival-goers, the prospect of another year in Cannes means another chance to catch up with this idiosyncratic auteur, whose work has always been defined by its looseness, as well as its ramshackle assembly of old-time film techniques, clipped pace and intellectual digressions.

Also Read: 'Matthias & Maxime' Film Review: Xavier Dolan Finds Maturity at the Ripe Old Age of 30

Compared to all that has preceded it, “Oh Mercy,” which premiered in Cannes on Wednesday, is his most unconventional film to date – precisely because it feels so very conventional.

A straight-down-the-line police procedural about a
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Matthias & Maxime’ Film Review: Xavier Dolan Finds Maturity at the Ripe Old Age of 30

‘Matthias & Maxime’ Film Review: Xavier Dolan Finds Maturity at the Ripe Old Age of 30
From one point of view, Xavier Dolan’s career looks like a precocious, single-minded blitz. As a director (he’s also a writer and actor), he’s made eight films between 2009 and 2019, with his first coming at the age of 20 and his latest, “Matthias & Maxime,” premiering at the Cannes Film Festival in the main competition on Wednesday. It is the sixth of Dolan’s films to play in Cannes, with “Mommy” winning the Jury Prize and “It’s Only the End of the World” winning the Grand Prize.

So why does “Matthias & Maxime” feel like a comeback of sorts for the former wunderkind who turned 30 two months ago? Why does it feel as if Dolan’s blitzkrieg of a career had reached a crisis point where it badly needed a film as sharp and warm as this one?

Mostly, that’s because of Dolan’s last two films.
See full article at The Wrap »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Matthias & Maxime’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Matthias & Maxime’
If there’s one term that Xavier Dolan probably never wants or needs to hear again, it’s “enfant terrible.” Irresistible to use when the Québécois auteur was 19, rattling out of the gate with his antsy, angry lash-out of a debut, “I Killed My Mother,” it’s followed him doggedly through a series of variously spiky, variably strong follow-up features. But Dolan has just turned 30, and with his eighth film, “Matthias & Maxime,” capping a filmography longer and more entrenched in its creative identity than many directors comfortably his senior, it seems time to put the label to rest. For “Matthias & Maxime” is not in any sense the work of an enfant terrible: A wistful, low-key love-and-friendship study, and something of a back-to-basics reset after his elaborate English-language misfire “The Death and Life of John P. Donovan,” it feels at once younger and older, sweeter and more seasoned, than Dolan’s last few films.
See full article at Variety »

‘Matthias & Maxime’ Review: Xavier Dolan’s Romantic but Unfocused Return to Form

‘Matthias & Maxime’ Review: Xavier Dolan’s Romantic but Unfocused Return to Form
It sounds like the premise of a Duplass brothers movie: Two lifelong dude pals, now approaching their late 20s and heading in very different directions, are convinced to make out as part of someone’s dumb student film; privately, but profoundly, the experience unlocks something at the heart of their friendship. In fact, it was the premise of a Duplass brothers movie (or at least a movie starring a Duplass brother).

Nevertheless, there is a world of difference between Lynn Shelton’s “Humpday” and Xavier Dolan’s new “Matthias & Maxime.” It’s a world of difference as clear but crossable as that between male friendship and male intimacy; gay panic and gay desire. Both films compellingly test the electric fence that runs along the parameters of heteronormative behavior, but only Dolan’s embraces the full seriousness of its story prompt.

In many ways the aging enfant terrible’s most
See full article at Indiewire »

'Matthias & Maxime': Film Review | Cannes 2019

'Matthias & Maxime': Film Review | Cannes 2019
He's baaa-aaack. After the spectacular one-two stumble of his forays outside Canada — to France in It’s Only the End of the World and America in The Death and Life of John F. Donovan — world cinema’s poutiest auteur, 30-year-old Xavier Dolan, returns to his native Quebec for Matthias & Maxime, a dramedy of repressed homosexual desire. If only it were a return to form.

There’s nothing glaringly wrong with the new movie. Centering on a pair of childhood best friends (played by Dolan and Gabriel D’Almeida Freitas) grappling with their more-than-platonic feelings for each other, it’s amiable ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Quentin Tarantino's 'Once Upon A Time… In Hollywood' splits critics on Screen's Cannes jury grid

Quentin Tarantino's 'Once Upon A Time… In Hollywood' splits critics on Screen's Cannes jury grid
It received both fours (excellent) and a zero (bad).

Quentin Tarantino’s highly-anticipated Once Upon A Time… In Hollywood has divided the opinions of Screen’s Cannes jury grid critics, receiving an average score of 3.0 for third place as it stands.

The 1969-set movie business story took five scores of four (excellent), more than any other title on the grid so far this year, from Time’s Stephanie Zacharek, The Guardian’s Peter Bradshaw, Sight & Sound’s Nick James, Meduza’s Anton Dolin and Screen’s own critic.

However a zero (bad) – only the third awarded so far on this
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Variety Celebrates 10 Producers to Watch in Cannes

  • Variety
Cannes–Variety honored its 10 Producers to Watch for 2019 at a brunch on Monday morning at Cannes’ Plage des Palmes.

Launched at the Cannes Film Festival in 1998, the annual event fetes 10 producers from the U.S. and the international film community who share a common commitment to bold, original, provocative storytelling.

The films produced by this year’s honorees have premiered on the Croisette and made waves in Sundance and Berlin, tackling challenging themes while offering a platform for diverse cinematic voices. Collectively they represent a dynamic community that is going to “regenerate, rejuvenate, revitalize cinema moving forward,” said Variety’s executive VP of content Steven Gaydos.

Katriel Schory, who is stepping down from the Israel Film Fund, was also honored with Variety’s Creative Impact Award. Under Schory’s stewardship of the fund, more than 300 feature-length films were produced in Israel, while the domestic audience grew from 100,000 to 1.5 million admissions per year.
See full article at Variety »

Xavier Dolan Hails ‘Magnificent’ Cannes Competitor ‘Portrait of a Lady on Fire’: A ‘Powerful Piece of Cinema’

Xavier Dolan Hails ‘Magnificent’ Cannes Competitor ‘Portrait of a Lady on Fire’: A ‘Powerful Piece of Cinema’
Cannes whiz kid Xavier Dolan may be readying to premiere his latest film, “Matthias & Maxime,” at the French festival that helped put him on the map, but the Québécois creator appears to have already picked a winner for this year’s Palme d’Or. In a moving and effusive Instagram post, the “Laurence Anyways” and “Mommy” filmmaker hailed Céline Sciamma’s “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” as “magnificent” and a “powerful piece of cinema.” The film debuted to rave reviews this weekend, with IndieWire’s own David Ehrlich hailing it as “a painterly masterpiece.”

After completing a self-described trilogy of coming-of-age films — “Water Lilies,” “Tomboy,” and “Girlhood” — Cannes regular Sciamma has shifted her interests in the female experience to her first-ever period piece. Set on an isolated island during the latter half of the eighteenth century, “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” features “Heaven Will Wait” star Noémie Merlant
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Film Festival Opens With More Netflix Drama and Too Few Female Directors (Again)

This story about the Cannes Film Festival first appeared in TheWrap’s Cannes magazine.

When competing for the Palme d’Or, “franchise” can be a four-letter word.

Sure, Cannes might program some out-of-competition would-be blockbusters here and there (this year’s entry is the Elton John biopic “Rocketman”), but examples of the F-word find little welcome in the discerning main competition of the world’s high temple of cinema — at least, not since “Shrek 2” somehow blustered its way in back in 2004.

Which makes it all the more ironic that the 2019 Cannes Film Festival feels in so many ways like a sequel to last year. We pick up the same storylines right where we left off. The war with Netflix rages on, with the streaming service staying away for the second year in a row. Female directors remain woefully under-represented. And certain hot-ticket titles remain conspicuously absent.

Also Read: Heavyweight
See full article at The Wrap »

Cannes Lineup Deep Dive: “Romantic & Political” Lineup Mixes Veterans And First-Timers

  • Deadline
Cannes Lineup Deep Dive: “Romantic & Political” Lineup Mixes Veterans And First-Timers
Unveiling what he categorized a “romantic and political” Official Selection this morning, Cannes Film Festival chief Thierry Frémaux offered up a roster of titles from veterans of the Riviera as well as first-timers, and a handful of so-called graduates from parallel sections to the main Competition.

Overall, there’s been mostly positive reaction to the selection revealed Wednesday that brings back such noted filmmakers as Terrence Malick, Ken Loach, the Dardenne brothers and Pedro Almodovar. As for the lesser-known names, hopes are high new discoveries will be made. One of the most notable takeaways from today’s lineup is the improved, if not yet equal, number of films directed by women. The festival has consistently come under fire for under-representation and last year pledged to do better.

As expected, feature films from the streamers are sitting this one out, something that Cannes addressed this morning, and while Hollywood glamour is slightly light,
See full article at Deadline »

Heavyweight Cannes Lineup Ties Record for Female Directors in Competition

Heavyweight Cannes Lineup Ties Record for Female Directors in Competition
Eleven months after signing a pledge to help increase the number of films by female directors at international festivals, the Cannes Film Festival has unveiled a lineup that features four films directed by women in the main competition, tying but not breaking the record set in 2011.

The four are Mati Diop’s “Atlantique,” Jessica Hausner’s “Little Joe,” Celine Schiamma’s “Portrait of a Young Lady on Fire” and Justine Triet’s “Sibyl.” An additional nine female directors are included in other sections of the festival.

Prior to this year, only 82 women have been included in the official competition at Cannes, compared to more than 1,600 men.

Also Read: Cannes Film Festival Signs Pledge for More Women Directors, More Transparency

The lineup is filled with heavyweight directors whose films have been at Cannes in the past: Pedro Almodovar, the Dardenne brothers (“Young Ahmed”), Bong Joon-ho (“Parasite”), Ken Loach (“Sorry We Missed You
See full article at The Wrap »

Cannes: Pedro Almodovar, Terrence Malick, Bong Joon-ho Appear Headed for Competition (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Cannes: Pedro Almodovar, Terrence Malick, Bong Joon-ho Appear Headed for Competition (Exclusive)
Films from a number of big-name returning auteurs – including Xavier Dolan, Pedro Almodovar, Terrence Malick, Bong Joon-ho and Ken Loach – appear to have a lock on competing at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, making for a stronger and starrier lineup than last year’s slate, sources tell Variety.

Dolan’s “Matthias & Maxime” (in which he stars), Almodovar’s self-reflective “Pain & Glory” and two-time Palme d’Or winner Loach’s “Sorry We Missed You” are set to join Jim Jarmusch’s previously announced opening film, “The Dead Don’t Die,” in competition, sources say. Other high-profile Cannes alumni who appear poised to return in competition include Malick, with his World War II drama “A Hidden Life” (previously titled “Radegund”); Bong, with “Parasite”; Marco Bellocchio, with his Mafia thriller “Traitor”; Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, with “Ahmed,” a look at religious fundamentalism in Europe; and Brazilian director Kleber Mendonça Filho,
See full article at Variety »

First Look: Xavier Dolan Begins Production on ‘Matthias & Maxime’ As We Get A Look At The Cast

We are still awaiting the world premiere of Xavier Dolan’s “The Death and Life of John F. Donovan,” but that doesn’t mean the filmmaker is slowing down. According to new reports, Dolan is already hard at work on production for his latest film “Matthias & Maxime.”

There are no details on what the plot for the film might be, but Twitter has your first look at the film, which is said to be set in Québec and focuses on a group of late-twentysomethings.

Continue reading First Look: Xavier Dolan Begins Production on ‘Matthias & Maxime’ As We Get A Look At The Cast at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

See also

Showtimes | External Sites


Recently Viewed