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4/10
Funny but incoherent father-son comedy.
3 April 2020
Warning: Spoilers
A funny look at precocious manipulation and consumerism through the coming of age story of a smart, wisely self confidant 12 year old kid who's jealous of his mother's relationship (mostly sexual) with a confused local police officer involved in a Media-infused case against a Hip Hop artist who runs a drug ring. The sarcasm is constant but the vocabulary is basically about genitals, oral sex, buttocks and others alike. The ever luminous Taraji P Henson plays the kid's mother, but her presence isn't enough to save the flaws of her character. The police officer decides to develop a friendship with the kid, bringing the film's best moments as well as the most funny sequences. The kid rules with a lively performance along with the other children actors. But his vocabulary is irritating and cursed filled. Not recommended for children (only if you want your kids to talk like him). A decent but incoherent father-son comedic take, it will somehow deliver good laughs, racial conflicts analysis, Media manipulation as well as relief from the current Crisis.
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The Occupant (2020)
5/10
Efficient but Uneven and Controversial
29 March 2020
Warning: Spoilers
An efficient thriller with uneven results and plenty of ups and downs (mostly downs), writers-directors Àlex Pastor and David Pastor's latest collaborative work is one of those examples of great premise getting lost and making no sense along the way.

It kicks off with the protagonist, Javier attending a job interview at a Publicity agency. They refuse him the job, due to his lack of experience with young material, as they quote, and his deep expression of hopelessness and uncertainty develops an immediate compassionate reaction from the viewer. Unable to pay for the parking space, he sort of causes a scene at the front desk, demanding a parking voucher refund, which is ultimately granted.

Back home, a luxurious condo at a privileged area, he does his best to connect and share the importance of family with wife and overweight teenage son, but things start to change when a dark cloud of financial despair is formed. In a heartbreaking decision, he's forced to let the family's housekeeper go, exchange the son's private school for the public system, and eventually move from the spacious, modern apartment.

Jobless, emotionally confused and economic fractured, his relationship with family decreases, especially as he lets greed and jealousy take over his conduct and behavior. Nostalgic, he observes the new tenants living at his previous place, and feeds a cruel plan to infiltrate in their lives. At first he studies their time schedule and secretly visits the place when they are out. Looking through their personal things he collects insightful information leading his own way into the new family's lives.

He realizes the patriarch, a handsome, young executive, is a constant participant of a group of recovery for addicts. He creates a new personality reflecting to both husband and wife's needs and interests, forwarding his intimacy with each of them.

The timely premise of financial despair and social budgets is abruptly lost along the way, as the compassion towards Javier, becomes fear and disgust. Things get even crazier, and even more repugnant, with the ingress of a new character, the privileged building's janitor, who recognizes the former resident and somehow figures out Javier's plan, blackmailing him in order to fulfill his perversion. Despite the controversy, and raw depiction of such an issue, the directors demonstrate a bold move and style, simply presenting the complexity of these disturbing characters without manipulating the reactions. Maybe that's not really a good idea. Example of that is the switching from compassion to hate towards Javier developed by any common-sense viewer. How could one possibly cheer for him, as everything he's committing are lies, and destruction? Is it a "Parasite" trend? There are obvious similarities here.

Javier is soon revealed as a psychopath with inexplicable reasons to torture and destroy his own family and the new occupants' as well. How can a character develop such social distortions in a small period of time. At the first interview, Javier seemed to be the perfect buddy for a Friday night's club gathering. He soon is depicted as the real representation of anyone's worse nightmare.

Though the narrative is efficient in keeping unexpected twists coming without anyone seeing it, with a fresh and seductive mood, it loses appeal and pace when the climax approaches. The cycle of lies are convincing in the beginning, but its tumult lacks sense as a whole, and extremely hard to digest, especially when it comes to decisive moments, or how the victims react.

Acclaimed and Award-winning actor Javier Gutiérrez delivers a strong, enigmatic performance as the cruel protagonist, an accomplished representation of a sadistic male crisis. The film belongs entirely to him, as the other actors are outshine (or perhaps intimidated) by his vulnerable, yet firm presence.

A gorgeously designed production, nominated for the Best Spanish Film Award at the 2020 Malaga Spanish Film Festival the Pastor pair created an intriguing social-economic parable but did not find the right tone and resolution. Still, they scored a distinguished goal in the manipulation-game genre.



THE OCCUPANT, Spain, 2020. A NetFlix Release. Now Streaming.
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Only (2019)
8/10
A virus changing the course of Humankind
16 March 2020
ONLY Nature and cinema have always inspired or predicted each other in many ways. Ironically, sadly and scarily, writer-director Takashi Doscher's "futuristic sci-fi" is an accurate and timely account of our troubled on-going times and changing lives, as everyone, rich and poor, black and white, are being afflicted by the coronavirus crisis. Freida Pinto (Slumdog Millionaire) and Tony-winning Leslie Odom Jr. (Harriet, the upcoming Hamilton) play a couple trying to survive a global plague targeting women. One of the last survivors, she remains hiding from authorities, as they seek a solution to re-populate Earth. She is unable to get pregnant, despite the many attempts with fertility technology. Their love support each other and maintain them in balance, but eventually they will risk everything in order to experience a bit of normalcy, unchaining from the quarantine and defying the obstacles, the hunting officials, and the mysteriously lethal ash storm, causing a virus that kills only women. Doscher proves incredible control with the material, creating a suspenseful thriller, punctuated by the brilliant editing, going back and forth in time to present the before, after and the current escape of the lovebirds. It opens with a knockout sequence, as a group of fully-armed guards, wearing protective gear and masks, unexpectedly enters the home of Eva and Will, looking to improve the quarantine rules and also hunting down women survivors. As a result, the couple decides to runaway, looking for a safer place to continue their journey and intense co-dependent love affair. The desperation and social conflict is captured with masterful techniques, setting up the narrative as a fast-pace and anxiously frenetic chasing-thriller. Unpredictable and coherent, the film presents through flashbacks idyllic moments of romance between the pair, their social activities and communion, as well as the initial impact caused by the contagion, the uncertainty and the unknown. During their escape, they stop at a diner, but her disguise is soon discovered and they are hunted by a couple of outlaws seeking to reproduce. They will do the unimaginable to overcome, including preparing for the worse and sacrificing some goals. Intense, bizarre, convincingly performed and well-structured, "Only" is an utterly important and alarming film for a crucial moment in humankind history. (Vertical Entertainment. On Demand.)
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Searching Eva (2019)
8/10
Stunning, Scandalous look at a Young Sex-Worker
4 March 2020
A young woman reveals scandalous topics of her personal and professional life, as well as exploring confidential, intimate traumas of her stolen childhood and eventual promiscuous behavior. An Italian immigrant living in Germany, Eva is seeking for the meaning of life while working as a part-time model and full-time sex worker. She spends the holidays back home, making amends with her past, as she re-encounters her previously heroine-addicted mother, and other relatives. Winner of a Special Mention at CPH:DOX Awards, director Pia Hellenthal crafts a hypnotizing documentary, an observational and compassionate look at dysfunctional behavior, rebellion and resistance. Provocative, unashamed and enthusiastic, Hellenthal captures an essential portrait of this generation's quest for identity and fulfillment.
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Burden (I) (2018)
8/10
A great surprise, fresh and moving
29 February 2020
Powerful story about Faith , the power of prayer and redemption. A beautiful account on reconciliation, compassion and forgiveness. Great heartbreaking performances, a promising directorial debut.
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8/10
Ultra Violent Account on our Troubled Times
28 February 2020
An electrifying account on our troubled times, director Rabah Ameur-Zaïmeche's ultra violent political thriller centers on the actions of a prudent doctor (a fierce performance by Ramzy Bedia) caught in the middle of a civil war, involving a terrorist group, local police, journalists, and innocent people. When the community is suddenly attacked from both sides, the doctor is tested by his own limits and integrity in order to protect and rescue. Shocking and extremely convincing, it paints an accurate canvas on human rights being distorted by modern insanity, greed and fanaticism.
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Burning Ghost (2019)
7/10
A Romantic, Bizarre and Meditative look at Dead Lovers
26 February 2020
A young man's ghost wanders through the city meeting up other dead folks and helping them get thru the process of understanding and adapting to their condition. A longtime lover is able to see (and feel) him, developing an eccentric, romantically surreal relationship, as he tries to recall his past feelings. Stéphane Batut's seductive and enigmatic feature debut is a captivating look at how we're easily able to forgive and forget, let go and re-adapt while dealing with the inevitable cycle of life.
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7/10
Gorgeous Look at Memory, Individual Time and Sexual Pleasure
26 February 2020
Director Christophe Honoré continues to build a brilliant career with focus on modern lovers battling obstacles and standards, while setting themselves free for love and pleasure. Gorgeous and versatile, Chiara Mastroianni exercises her comic skills as a promiscuous adulterous who finds herself on a deep self-examination after getting caught by her prudent husband. In a stylish, elegant and ambiguous dreamlike atmosphere, deeply influenced by Buñuel and Fellini, the director conceives a provocative, sexy and contemplative analysis on a marital crisis, as well as an intriguing homage to memory and individual time.
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8/10
Superb Realistic Financial Trouble Drama
21 February 2020
A father arrives home, exhausted, drained after a 16-hour shift work, humiliated by his boss, pressured by his competitors, and smitten by unjust policies, just to find more tempest under his own roof. His wife is doing all sacrifices imaginable to support him as he invests on a self-employed delivery franchise; his precocious teenage son is experiencing the rebel age of youth, engaged on graffiti, avoiding school and committing small crimes; their youngest daughter observes the chaotic situation as her childhood is forced to mature. A master of storytelling with focus on the struggles of the British minority communities, two-time Palme d'Or-winning, 83-year-old director Ken Loach follow-up to his extraordinary "I, Daniel Blake" turns the lenses on a modern family in Newcastle dealing with financial disaster and stirred emotions. He deeply observes the family's motives, anger, despair, strong bond and compassion for each other with his usual, sensible, efficiently moving techniques. His extreme sensibility and depth have made him a notorious Neo-realist filmmaker, comparable to Rossellini and De Sica. Kris Hitchen and Debbie Honeywood are in perfect chemistry as the couple dealing with the effects of an economic crisis, the changes and conflicts of parenthood, and the shapes of now-a-days working exploitation. Heartbreaking, naturally absorbing and perfectly convincing, Loach continues to be one of the greatest filmmakers of out time with this powerful meditation on the strength of family perseverance.
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8/10
Fast Paced, Visually Arresting Mobsters-On-Bike Tale
21 February 2020
Rain falls hard over a remote area where a mobster-on-the-run awaits instructions from a mysterious woman; the camera captures the dazzling, stylish and inventive visions of director Diao Yinan as he opens this action-packed thriller demonstrating how poetically he conceives a scene. Bleeding, hurt and wanted, Zenong has wrongly shot a cop, while on a competition with other gangster families, in order to claim control over the drug/theft most profitable streets. Aiai is a hustler and "bath lover"- a Chinese modern version of prostitution- who is working on both sides, struggling to survive as a mediatior on the bloodshed war between the gangsters' families and the police seeking to avenge their colleague. As they wait for their next move, they both narrate in flashbacks the circumnstances prior, when the street war sparkled a revolution on the local criminal business. An electrifying, fast-paced, ultra violent and seductive neo-noir thriller, Yinan obviously understands of visual techniques, conceiving each frame as a piece of art in movement, with lyrical, glamorous observations on the details, on the silent moments embracing the unexpected, the subtle eroticism, the rain, the neon lights on the roads, but most impressively how he extracts poetry from the bloody confrontations and its uncontrollable shootings. Addressing male rivalry and dominance, pride and greed, it's a riveting, visually-arresting and superbly crafted mobster-on-bikes tale.
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8/10
Realistic portrait of family struggle
19 February 2020
A father arrives home, exhausted, drained after a 16-hour shift work, humiliated by his boss, pressured by his competitors, and smitten by unjust policies, just to find more tempest under his own roof. His wife is doing all sacrifices imaginable to support him as he invests on a self-employed delivery franchise; his precocious teenage son is experiencing the rebel age of youth, engaged on graffiti, avoiding school and committing small crimes; their youngest daughter observes the chaotic situation as her childhood is forced to mature. A master of storytelling with focus on the struggles of the British minority communities, two-time Palme d'Or-winning, 83-year-old director Ken Loach follow-up to his extraordinary "I, Daniel Blake" turns the lenses on a modern family in Newcastle dealing with financial disaster and stirred emotions. He deeply observes the family's motives, anger, despair, strong bond and compassion for each other with his usual, sensible, efficiently moving techniques. His extreme sensibility and depth have made him a notorious Neo-realist filmmaker, comparable to Rossellini and De Sica. Kris Hitchen and Debbie Honeywood are in perfect chemistry as the couple dealing with the effects of an economic crisis, the changes and conflicts of parenthood, and the shapes of now-a-days working exploitation. Heartbreaking, naturally absorbing and perfectly convincing, Loach continues to be one of the greatest filmmakers of out time with this powerful meditation on the strength of family perseverance.
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Goldie (II) (2019)
8/10
Outstanding NYC Street Conflicts Drama
14 February 2020
Living in a community shelter in the Bronx with her mother and two little sisters, teenager Goldie is running against time to gather everything she needs (including an expensive golden coat) for a promising gig. An aspiring free-style, hip-hop dancer, she runs through the streets of the borough, claiming her right to be free and young in New York City, while flirting, shoplifting, meeting associates and preparing herself to dance on a music video. When her mother is taken away by the cops, she runs away with her two little sisters trying to protect them from child services, avoiding separation and facing a harder task: responsibility. She won't give up on pursuing her dancing dreams, which will put her on the path of dangerous drug-dealers, and other unexpected obstacles, as she tries to survive and accomplish at the same time. Award-winning director Sam de Jong's sophomore feature film is a colorful, vibrant, realistic portrait of youth in the Bronx, addressing the struggles of empoverish Millennials and the incliments to criminality. Model Slick Woods gives a breakthrough performance as the protagonist, building up a charismatic, spontaneously funny and outrageously feminist character with truthful passion. The supporting cast also shines, a bunch of eccentric, modern-based youngsters whose priority in life is to have fun, especially Angela Griszell as the clueless Princess, and fully-tatooed Jose Rodriguez, as a promiscuous playboy. With the help of a brilliant redish tone cinematography capturing the warmth and heat of the streets and its people, and the pot-boiling situation, as well as a precise, animation-mixed editing, great soundtrack, director de Jong conceived a daring, engaging coming-of -age story. Nominated for the Crystal Bear Award at Berlin, he is definItely one filmmaker to watch.
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Ballon (2018)
8/10
Vivid Family Bond Escape War Drama
12 February 2020
A masterly crafted political thriller set in 1979's communist East Germany, director Michael Herbig's suspenseful drama follows the desperate actions and courageous escape of two families, running from the pressures and horrors of Civil War, as they attempt to sail over the border in a homemade hot-air balloon. Winner of the Audience Choice Award at Heartland International Film Festival, the film centers on the strong bond and dedication of a father and mother, and their two sons. It also deeply observes the reactions over the children, creating a parallel story: the oldest one is living his first romance with the daughter of an official, while the youngest demonstrates conflicts with innocence and the acceptance of a divided nation. As they fail on their first risky attempt, they are forced to re-arrange their plans for a new balloon, while The Stasi speeds up an investigation, rapidly tracking them. Based on an adventurous true story, vividly performed by a convincing cast, especially Friedrich Mücke, as Peter Strelzyk the leader of the Balloon Operation, it's a triumphant family drama.
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9/10
Sensitive, Truthful and Touching look at Motherhood
6 February 2020
Argentinian actress and author Romina Paula's debut feature is a delicate, touching and humanistic look at the cycle of life, its ups and downs, and its need to reinvent itself throughout the journey. Dealing with a complicated existential crisis, and an unbalanced marriage, a woman returns to her mother's home along with her 3 year-old son seeking to overcome the situation. She does everything possible to enjoy that "vacation", meeting up with old friends, attending parties, working on a teaching gig, and finding comfort in a couple of enthusiastic flirts. But mostly, she's reconnecting to her roots, to her mother, discovering and preparing her son, and also examining herself as an important piece of the family tree and as a loyal partner. Filled with charismatic performances, truthful dialogue, and brilliantly blending documentary and fiction, Paula conceived a sensitive, utterly feminine and rich meditation on motherhood and the responsibilities of family. Bravo!
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9/10
Excellent doc, Original, Humane!
4 February 2020
Toritama is a small village in the Pernambuco's Agreste region, known as the capital of jeans, whose inhabitants are self-employed jeans manufacturers, enjoying their financial freedom. Renowned Brazilian filmmaker Marcelo Gomes ("Once Upon a Time Veronica", "I Travel Because I Have To") scoops out the lives of these hardworking folks, their exhaustion, perspectives, honesty and humble concepts, as they go through memories and curiosities of themselves and the place, all while they wait for the fun and freedom of Carnival season. Poetical, humane and original, Gomes scores another goal in his accomplished career.
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Airplane Mode (2020)
6/10
A debauchery look at social media fever
25 January 2020
Excellent comedy about the social media era flaws and risks. Well performed, satirical and touching at equal levels.
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José (II) (2018)
7/10
Touching depiction of poverty and gay love
23 January 2020
Winner of the Queer Lion Award at Venice Film Festival, director Li Cheng's sophomore feature is a modest, highly touching and perceptive drama about financial struggle and sexual identity, highlighted by the conflicts imposed by a intolerable society in Latin-American countries. First-time actor Enrique Salanic gives a compelling, utterly convincing performance as the protagonist, a young man living with his mother in a small town in Guatemala. They both work hard in tough jobs, trying to make ends meet, avoiding corruption and crime as decent citizens. José maintains a secret love affair with another young fellow, who dreams of leaving the country for a better chance of surviving and to experience freedom for their choices. Conflicts surge among them, as José is strongly attached to his mother, a co-dependent relationship open for any sacrifices. Cheng examines crucial topics on behavior and acceptance with simplicity and honesty. He also conceives a striking look at poverty and hopelessness, while depicting the pleasures and risks of a Latin gay coming of age experience.
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Crescendo (II) (2019)
7/10
Heartbreaking depiction of political conflicts
10 January 2020
Accomplished filmmaker Dror Zahavi's timely drama depicts the turmoils and conflicts between Israelis and Palestianians seen through Millennials' perspectives and traumas. A respected and tough Maestro is hired to conceive a Chamber Orchestra for peace in the region; Gathering the best musicians from both sides of the war conflict, he is ready for what's coming: as they rehearse their piece, they will also experience a transformational and moving collective process, providing them an examination of themselves and their political senses. In one of several heartbreaking scenes, the Maestro allows them to expose all of their anguish and hate on the face of the others, provoking a self-analysis. Centered on the relationships developed along the production, the film constantly remind us of the importance of tolerance, while trying to adjust their reasons: an impossible romance between an Israeli girl and an Arab, the ego and dispute between the two violin leaders, the figure of "salvation" represented by the Maestro, and the strength of parental guidance. Profound, raw, and sensitive, it's a powerful humanitarian statement, claiming for better days in this broken world.
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8/10
A Complex Tale of a Woman's Reckless Actions
9 January 2020
A strong personification of a woman's empowerment, Anat is determined to achieve her goals at any cost. She had been on a long journey to find the right place for her genius pianist son, a master musician whom she had been teaching since he was born. In the opening scene, Anat is performing herself on stage, when her water breaks. Right after labor, she is devastated with the news her son is deaf. She then commits a crime, exchanging the babies, and making sure she will have a healthy one coming home with her. A bold take on the power of a woman's control and a mother's ambition, first-time director Itay Tal conceives a thought-provoking and seductive film that stirs up controversy in many topics: the fact someone's talent could be related to genetics or early manipulation of practices and ideas; a subtly justification of a woman's desperate actions; the role of an absent male dominance; the pressures on a child whose childhood is evidently stolen due to adults' self interests. Presenting this fierce and audacious female character, caught on a reckless actions with permanent consequences, actress Naama Preis gives a superb performance, marked by intense complexity and mystery. She won the Best Actress Award at Jerusalem Film Festival for this incredibly unpredictable role. Observational and highly dramatic, Itay Tal is a filmmaker to watch.
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Leona (2018)
7/10
Impressive Family/Millennial Drama
7 January 2020
An impressive, timely directorial debut, Isaac Cherem's modern romance channels this generation's emotional conflicts as they seek acceptance and meaning among family and society. Set in now-a-days Mexico City, the film paints a relevant portrait of a Jewish community preserving their values and traditions. When Ariela (seductively played by Naian González Norvind) starts a love affair with a non-Jewish man, she becomes the center of an interior conflict that could lead them apart, dividing the family. Cherem deeply observes both sides of the conflict and their reasons, with focus on Ariela's search for sexual and professional identity. Vibrant, stylish and precise, it's an accomplished look at family traditions, a young woman's quest for freedom and the uncontrollable force of desire.
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Incitement (2019)
8/10
Enigmatic, Raw, Thrilling Murderer's depiction.
6 January 2020
Set in early 90's, director Yaron Zilberman's sophomore feature film follows a young university student who becomes a radical leader determined to exterminate the enemy among his Jewish community, as he engages on a political war against Israel's Prime Minister, Yitzhak Rabin. Rising star Yehuda Nahari Halevi gives a breakthrough performance as the villain protagonist, building up his character with incredible skills: he must fulfill his duties with family, friends and girlfriend, all while trying to organize a fully-armed, rebel movement. Israel's official entry for the 2020 0scars, and named Best Film by the Israeli Film Academy, it captures the anxiety and tension of the crime with extreme brilliance and fast paced action, while connecting the crime to relevant romantic and familiar insights. Zilberman conceives a suspenseful, detailed and observational psychological thriller depicting a man's journey from a regular activist guy to a notorious murderer.
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Ad Astra (2019)
8/10
One of a kind.
16 December 2019
Stunningly shot and inventive, James Gray's best film to date. It deserves to be nominated for the Best Picture Oscars as well as Production design and Cinematography.
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Sol Alegria (2018)
7/10
Funny, Hallucinating, Subversive.
28 November 2019
Blending Avant-Garde, absurdist humor, political commentary and surrealism, director Tavinho Teixeira's hallucinating road movie introduces a very dysfunctional family as representations of an anarchist society battling the system, the counterculture. In a current disturbingly apocalyptic era, they steal from corrupt pastors, and join a rebel gang of armed nuns in a secured remote area, where they plan strategies for a war, while experiencing drugs, orgies, fetishes, cleansing and connections to the unknown. Filled with sharp dialogue addressing political, social and sexual taboos, it's a madly inventive, explicit, subversive and extravagant comedy about an out-of-control land of power, sex liberation, corruption and fanaticism.
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Runner (2019)
8/10
Heart wrenching and inspiring!
1 October 2019
The story of Guor a South Sudan war survivor Athlete fighting borders and bureaucracy to accomplish his objective: run in the Olympics A thrilling, inspiring and detailed account on the country's starving issue, civil war and humanitarian negligence. Winner of several awards in the US and around the world, it's a triumphant look at a man's determination and passionate dreams.
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8/10
Urgent, Funny & Necessary.
9 September 2019
Excellent film. Eye opening. Funny, accurate, controversial. Spurlock scores another urgent and necessary exposé on the eating culture in America. One might as well become vegetarian- you won't ever look at poultry the same way again.
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